Holiday Breakfast: Popovers & Scrambled Eggs

Wishing you all a very happy + safe holiday! 

It is said the American style popover originated in Portland Oregon derived from the Yorkshire Pudding origins of Yorkshire county in Northern England. Whether true or not the principle of a good Yorkshire Pudding or Popover derives from using a crepe-like batter dough. To make a popover, change the beef fat drippings (from the roast) to butter- for a more updated flavorful batter. Whatever style you prefer to make, just remember don’t open the oven door and peek in the oven- if you want a tall pop-over from this crepe-like muffin. 

Yorkshire Pudding or Popovers are usually served with roasted meats. A dear friend recently shared with me that he serves popovers with scrambled eggs for breakfast or brunch. Great idea!

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Popovers & Yorkshire Pudding  

Makes 12 popovers

Adapted From Adventures in Grilling Cookbook

by George Hirsch with Marie Bianco

5 Tablespoons butter, melted

2 eggs, beaten 

1 cup milk

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon hot sauce

1 cup all-purpose flour

pinch of fresh grated nutmeg and black pepper

Optional: 1 teaspoon fresh chopped thyme, rosemary or chives

Grease and flour a 12 cup muffin or popover pan. Add a teaspoon of melted butter to each cup of a 12-cup muffin pan.

Mix flour, eggs, milk, 1 Tablespoon melted butter, sugar and salt. Beat in the flour a little bit at a time and add herbs if using; mixture should be smooth. Do not over mix the batter or the gluten will overdevelop and the popovers will be tough. Let batter rest for fifteen minutes. 

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Place empty/ unfilled muffin pan in hot oven to preheat pan for two minutes or until smoking hot. 

Carefully remove hot muffin pan from oven and fill each cup halfway. Bake for 15-20 minutes, then reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees, and continue baking for 15-20 minutes more, or until popovers are puffed and browned.  

Remove Popovers from pan immediately and serve hot.

Tips:

If serving scrambled eggs with popovers, begin to cook eggs 5 minutes before removing popovers from oven.

Do not open oven to check popovers until they have baked for at least 30 minutes. 

To test for doneness, tap the outside of Popover; it should sound hollow. 

Popovers

 

 

Cranberry Hootycreeks

I always look forward to this time of year sharing a post from my dearest friend and co-author of four of my cookbooks. I've enjoyed many days with laughter with Marie and her husband Frank's great espresso. A tradition in my book for the Christmas season, I hope you make Marie's Hootycreeks a holiday traditions too. 

Guest holiday post + recipe today by Marie Bianco, my dear friend, food writer and author. 

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Edible holiday gifts always make a hit and this one is about as easy as it can get. Even school age children can get into the act. 

The cookie ingredients are layered in a wide-mouth canning jar which you can buy for about a buck each. Make sure you get the wide-mouth ones because it’s easier to get the ingredients into those jars rather than the narrow neck ones. If you’re planning on making a large quantity of mix for all those people on your list who you want to give “a little something” invest in a wide mouth funnel.

Tap each layer down in the order given. Once the lid is in place, cut a circle of gingham or holiday fabric and fasten it with a rubber band. Then tie a ribbon around the jar and include the recipe directions printed out on the computer or written in your best hand.

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Cranberry Hootycreeks

1 jar Cranberry Hootycreek Mix

½ cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, softened

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, cream butter, egg and vanilla. Add the Cranberry Hootycreek Mix by hand until the mixture is well blended. Drop by tablespoons onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake 8 to 10 minutes, or until edges just begin to brown. Transfer to wire rack and cook. Makes 18 to 24 cookies.

Cranberry Hootycreeks Mix

½ cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

½ cup old-fashioned oats

½ cup all-purpose flour

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

1/3 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup granulated sugar

½ cup dried cranberries

½  cup white chocolate chips

½ cup chopped pecans

Layer the ingredients in the order given into a 1-quart, wide mouth, canning jar. Pack each layer into place before adding the next ingredient.

Attach a gift tag with the mixing and baking directions.

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Sgroppino

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Here's a Thanksgiving toast for you. Cheers!

All Champagne, by definition, must come from vineyards in the Champagne region of France. This is a small region comprising three districts which include the towns of Reims, Troyes, Charleville-Mezier and Chalons. Prosecco, produced in the Veneto region of Italy is considered an everyday drink or sparkling wine. Unlike most Champagne it does not improve with age and should really be consumed within six months of the time it’s purchased, or within a year of bottling. It tends to be dryer than many Champagnes. A good Prosecco, is inexpensive and very drinkable; right for any occasion even breakfast.

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Sgroppino Italian Cocktail

chefgeorgehirsch.com | George Hirsch Lifestyle

Chill 4-6 Champagne flutes 

2 cups chilled Prosecco (Italian sparkling white wine) 

2 Tablespoons chilled vodka 

1 cup frozen lemon sorbet 

2 Tablespoons half & half 

4 fresh strawberries, split for garnish 

4 fresh mint leaves 

Mix Prosecco, vodka, sorbet and half & half in blender for 1 minute. Pour mixture immediately into chilled champagne flutes. Top with berries and mint. 

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Lemon Ricotta Pound Cake

Celebrating Chef George's 24th Anniversary on PBS

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If you are planning to entertain this week or happen to be traveling to visit friends - I have the perfect host/hostess bring-along, or an outstanding dessert with wide appeal to finish a dinner. I created this recipe knowing it would be one of those cakes that gets better with age; meaning, it tastes even better the day after it is baked.

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Lemon Ricotta Pound Cake

Makes one large loaf, or three demi-loaves

chefgeorgehirsch.com | George Hirsch Lifestyle

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour

2 1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon kosher salt

3/4 cup sweet butter, softened

1 1/2 cups (15 oz container) fresh whole-milk ricotta, drained

1 1/2 cups Turbino or granulated sugar

3 eggs, beaten

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons grated lemon zest

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Confectioner’s sugar for dusting

Preheat oven to 350°F degrees. Grease and flour 9-inch loaf pan.

In a large bowl, cream butter, and sugar until smooth and light. Fold in ricotta in three parts. Scrape bowl well with a spatula. Mix dry ingredients- flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add to butter and sugar and mix just until flour is absorbed with eggs one at a time, scraping sides of bowl after each addition. Add lemon juice and vanilla. 

Scrape down sides of the bowl, mix on low speed, 30 seconds just until batter is completely mixed. Do not over mix. Over mixing will toughen cake and produce air pockets. Pour the batter into greased pan and smooth on top. Once pan is filled with batter, tap pan against table or counter to remove air pockets.

Bake for 45-55 minutes. After 40 minutes, lower to 325 degrees until done. Allow cake to cool in pan for 5-10 minutes. Remove from pan; finish cooling on wire rack. Top with confectioner’s sugar before serving.